30+ Peculiar Things That Can Only Be Found in China

Facekinis

When at the beach, you expect to see tourists from all over the world exposing as much of their skin as possible to get a nice tan. The consensus in China, though, is that pale skin is desirable, so you won’t see women going to the beach in a skimpy bathing suit. They still go to the beach, but on their own terms…in the beaches of Qingdao, for example, a local entrepreneur popularized the facekini, which conveniently protects both from UV rays and jellyfish.

Facekinis

Resting in Pieces

You might think this is the shredded-up product of a recycling process in China, yet notice that those are trucks around all those multicolored objects. Although it looks like astroturf or something, this is a bicycle graveyard that was created after a dockless bike-sharing initiative failed. For the most part, these initiatives have transformed the streets of Chinese cities for the better, yet there are those lambasting the new bike-sharing platforms for the chaos they cause on the roads.ADVERTISEMENT

Resting in Pieces

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Parking for Women

While some people have praised the women-only parking spots that you can see in China today, others have criticized them for being misogynistic. The parking spots are bigger, implying that women need more room to park because, supposedly, they aren’t as good at driving. On the other hand, they are often conveniently situated near exits, a point which supporters say grants women a feeling of safety. Whether you believe this to be a step in the right direction or not, it’s definitely a curiosity to be wondered at.ADVERTISEMENT

Parking for Women

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Panda Fashion

The Chinese have different labor standards than you’d expect to see in Western countries — indeed, the acceptable amount of weekly work hours differs significantly — but that doesn’t mean you won’t see Chinese workers having a good time dressing up at work (as Panda bears). These majestic creatures are at risk of becoming extinct because of habitat loss and a low birth rate, yet it seems that the whole nation is behind efforts to save one of China’s most iconic symbols. In fact, a few years ago they were redesignated as “vulnerable” instead of “endangered.”ADVERTISEMENT

Panda Fashion

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Clean Air Is a Commodity

You might have heard news reports about how polluted the air is in Chinese metropolises, from Guangzhou to Beijing, and the reality is the residents deal with this issue on a day-to-day basis. In such environments, fresh air has become a commodity — literally. In recent years, Chinese vendors started selling canned air from where the atmosphere has less airborne contaminants. Chen Guangbiao, a Chinese entrepreneur who formerly focused on recycling industries, sold 8,000,000 cans in just 10 days!ADVERTISEMENT

Clean Air Is a Commodity

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Questionable Cuisine

Chinese food in China is usually different from what people expect from the Chinese food available outside of China. The different regions in China use starkly different spices and flavors, but one thing that you will see everywhere is food that other cultures don’t consider fit for human consumption. Cockroaches, scorpions, crocodiles, bugs — you might find all sorts of meat you’re not used to eating. Whether you try it or not is up to you, just be respectful…and keep in mind that what you think is a pet store might actually be where locals buy groceries!ADVERTISEMENT

Questionable Cuisine

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Splish Splash

There are almost 1.4 billion people living in China, making it the most populous country in the world. When you go visit, one of the first things that you will notice is how the people seem so accustomed to these ridiculous crowds. The Chinese simply do things differently, as seen in this picture from a Chinese waterpark. They look like they’re having a good time squished together in the water, but if someone suddenly wants to get out it seems like it would take some effort!ADVERTISEMENT

Sardine Can Waterpark

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Squatty Potty

In the West, people sit down to deal with their bowel movements, yet in many countries, such as China, the norm is to squat. You won’t always find a Western toilet in China, so if you don’t want to try something new you may find yourself in a bind. While many places do cater to the sit-down style, as you can see in the picture, that doesn’t mean that your expectations of bathroom privacy will also be met. Instead of private stalls, doing your business is a communal affair here.ADVERTISEMENT

Squatty Potty

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Police Geese

Some municipal police departments have opted for an unorthodox replacement for guard dogs: geese. While some might say that being chased by a dog is scarier, those people have obviously never rubbed a goose the wrong way. But wait, aren’t these just elegant and graceful creatures? Despite their beauty, these birds are also extremely territorial and will not hesitate to attack you. Plus, don’t forget that they can fly. You can climb a tree to escape a dog, but the same cannot be said about geese.ADVERTISEMENT

Police Geese

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Cockroach Farms

This will disgust those who see these creatures solely as pests, yet billions of cockroaches are bred each year in Chinese farms. Cockroach extracts have some surprising health benefits, it is claimed, and they can also be used as animal feed. Don’t forget that cockroaches are eaten by humans as well in China. If anything goes wrong on one of these farms and the roaches successfully stage a daring escape, though, local communities will be overrun with these bugs. The big question is whether such an escape will be a free food boon or public health concern.ADVERTISEMENT

Cockroach Farms

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Marriage Markets

While many cultures practice arranged marriages, China takes things to a whole new level. Visitors to China will notice odd markets where elderly parents try to snag a spouse for their young boy or girl. Parents list the relevant information about their child and, hopefully soon, a passerby will come offering a suitable match. We don’t know what the kids think about all of this, so let’s hope the parents at least let them meet their spouses-to-be before they marry them off!ADVERTISEMENT

Marriage Markets

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Taking a Nap

Another cultural phenomenon visitors may notice is that people seem to pass out everywhere and anywhere. While this often is an indication of vagrancies in Western societies, in China people won’t bat an eye if someone falls asleep in a public place. These images show how the Chinese take things to the next level when it comes to getting enough hours of shut-eye in a day. These guys are professional nappers who didn’t forget the importance of head support.ADVERTISEMENT

Taking a Nap

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A Truck Taking 10 Trucks

Where there’s a will, there’s a way, especially in China. If someone doesn’t want to do a job, someone else will do it, and that means that people will often go to extremes to get a job done as efficiently as possible. While other people might have loaded fewer trucks on more trucks to deliver the order, this entrepreneur found a way to get 10 on one truck! How well they are secure, though, is a completely different question that will only be answered if the driver takes a sharp turn.ADVERTISEMENT

A Truck Taking 10 Trucks

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Dancing in the Streets

China isn’t always painted in the best light in the media, yet visitors who come back won’t be lying if they report dancing in the streets. Flash mobs are really big in China, and older women often join in as a good way to have fun and stay active. Not everyone is such a big fan of this, however, and other residents have actively tried to stop the phenomenon because of how often loud music blares in public, which is aggravating, understandably.ADVERTISEMENT

Dancing in the Streets

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Dragon Escalator

Longqing Gorge, just about 50 miles away from Beijing, is one of the most popular getaways for people looking to enjoy the great outdoors. It also houses one of the biggest dams in China, but you need to overcome your fears to see it — the only way in is through a ferocious dragon’s mouth! Actually, it’s a giant escalator network, which is the largest of its kind in the world, but it only goes up one way. To get down, you can either walk down the steps or take a toboggan.ADVERTISEMENT

Dragon Escalator

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Funny Fishing Habits

You’ll often see Chinese people fishing at sources of water, even those that don’t seem very clean at times. However normal that might seem, these images caught some Chinese people fishing very oddly. In the first image, you have what looks to be people feeding the bears at the zoo with fishing poles, but bear fishing sounds like a dangerously bad idea. In the second image, it looks like this guy is trying to act like a bear and catch fish with his mouth.ADVERTISEMENT

Funny Fishing Habits

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Overload on the Road

Two-wheeled vehicles are popular all over the world, but the way they are driven in China is slightly different than how you might be used to. Other places might not consider them suitable to take so much stuff, but in China, it’s not uncommon to see an absolutely unsafe amount of cargo being strapped onto a moped or motorcycle. Keeping a safe distance from the vehicle in front of you is extra important when you can plainly see how haphazardly things are attached onto bikes.ADVERTISEMENT

Overload on the Road

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Fireworks Are a Common Fire Hazard

The Chinese invented fireworks, and this invention remains popular today in China. Apparently, though, the Chinese like their fireworks just a bit more than the average nation, judging by this sign. Who would have thought that they are lit with such abandon out in public that gas stations need to put up “no lighting fireworks” in place of “no smoking” signs? Clearly, the gas station is going to put up a sign warning against the most likely cause of a potential fire, and voilà!ADVERTISEMENT

Fireworks Are a Common Fire Hazard

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Giving it a Push

This image of plane passengers giving the plane a push is one of the most peculiar on this list. It looks like it just needs to get started, but the truth is the plane broke down after it landed and ended up in the water. Everyone onboard was really lucky to be alive and not the victims in a tragic crash, yet the 20-ton plane needed to be taken half a mile back to the runway, which took two hours. In China, don’t expect a truck or tractor to do the work of a hundred men!ADVERTISEMENT

Giving it a Push

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Panda People

The Panda bear, one of the most recognizable symbols for wildlife conservation worldwide, is also one of the most important symbols for China. Seeing as the creature is native to China, Chinese scientists have an important role in helping the population thrive in the wild. To do so, they dress up as pandas and douse themselves with panda scent so that young pandas don’t get used to humans. If they are used to relying on us when they grow up, too, it threatens their chances to make it in the wild.ADVERTISEMENT

Panda People

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Nail Houses

The Chinese are famous for some of the biggest projects in the world, from the Great Wall to the enormous dams they build today. They’ve famously evacuated millions of people for various projects, yet some people refuse to leave, despite the offer of compensation. These are known as dingzihu, or nail houses, as they stick out like a stubborn nail that refuses to be hammered in. Although this house impedes traffic, it’s far more than a vestige of what was there before, representing an individual’s right to their home.ADVERTISEMENT

Nail Houses

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Would You Accept This Challenge?

Eating competitions are thrown all over the world, but China does it a bit differently, just like a lot that they do. Here you see a chili-eating contest where the contestants are made to sit in a pool of peppers up to their waists. It’s a funny gimmick, but it looks like the Scoville measurements of these peppers are anything but amusing. The expression on this poor man’s face is all you need to see before taking extreme caution with these peppers.ADVERTISEMENT

Would You Accept This Challenge?

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The Mao Cut

Just like other nations, the Chinese are proud of their culture and heritage. This patriotic youth wants to celebrate his homeland, and what more iconic symbol to emblazon in one’s hair than Tiananmen Square in Beijing? This barber is showing off his mad hair-cutting skills — just look at the intricacy of the Chinese characters! All that needed to be added is a sticker Chairman Mao, considered the father of the modern country, and the hairdo is perfect.ADVERTISEMENT

The Mao Cut

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Don’t Forget Your Thermos!

While you will often see Chinese people walking around with thermoses, they’re probably not filled with chicken noodle soup. Chances are it’s not coffee or tea either, as you might expect, but just hot water. Chinese people will just drink plain hot water because it’s considered somewhat of a panacea in China, where people are just as conscious about their health as in other places. Although this is widespread in China, drinking hot water by itself hasn’t yet become as widespread in the rest of the world.ADVERTISEMENT

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Facemask Fashion

China’s economy boasts impressive growth, judging by the GDP of recent decades, yet the reality is that its transformation into a global powerhouse has come at a serious price — pollution. Water contamination aside, the air pollution we associate with China can cause all sorts of medical complications, including lung maladies. Many Chinese people wear medical masks outside to prevent themselves from breathing airborne particles. They have become so widespread that women wear them as a fashionable accessory, like this lady in pink.ADVERTISEMENT

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Pajama Fashion

The Chinese aren’t the only nation who don’t consider it a fashion faux pas to go around in public wearing pajamas, yet that doesn’t mean it’s not surprising to see people like this going out in public wearing nightclothes. While it might be comfortable to wear and have the advantage of covering the whole body, pajamas aren’t the first choice when finding proper biking attire. We might be able to forgive her had she worn a helmet, but seeing someone like this on the open roads is jarring.ADVERTISEMENThttps://8efd42319c1026e9d7eb47131b1de2b0.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

Pajama Fashion

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Panjin Red Beach

Panjin Red Beach, located in Liaoning province, is where tourists flock every autumn to see the red beaches. This phenomenon occurs because of a species of seaweed, normally green, that changes color in the autumn, similar to the foliage of New England. A lot of the beach is closed off to tourists because human presence can easily compromise the delicate balance in the ecosystem, which also includes 26 species of birds, but there are several areas that are open to visitors.ADVERTISEMENT

Panjin Red Beach

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Knockoffs

Colonel Sanders must be rolling over in his grave! And it’s hard to imagine that Starbucks, a trademarked company with thousands of locations open in China, would be fine with this copyright infringement. The fact is, though, there are so many people and so many eateries in China that regulating such details is impossible for the authorities. In either of these cases, it’s up to the corporation to make a legal claim. Meanwhile, the business-minded restaurateurs know they can attract extra business by ripping off recognizable global brands.ADVERTISEMENT

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